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scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



M 




ISSUED WEEKLY BY 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

BUREAU OF AGRiCULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 

VOL. 33 NOVEMBER 9, 1936 ~No7"l9 

FEATURE ARTICLE 

UNITED STATES AGRICULTURAL IMPORTS, 1935-36 
(Page 551) 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Page 



Argentine wheat condition generally good 545 

Shanghai wheat and flour markets decline 545 

Oriental tobacco situation 546 

Danube Basin makes plans for retaining lard export markets 550 



544 .Forei£:n Crops and Mar':ets Vol. 33, IJo . 19 

LATE CABLES 



Czechos lo va'^-:ia . 195G .jvo auction estimates reported as 
fol].ows, with 1935 co.Ti;oar iuons in pcxentheses: Wheat 55,593,009 
busnels (63,095,000), rye 55,533,000 (64, 501, OOu) , Parley 
46, SOS', 000 (43,750,000), oats 63, 913, 000 (70,763,000), corn 
13,362,000 (5,966,000), potatoes 341,565,000 "bushels (282,094,000). 
(international Institute of Agriculture, Rone, jxToveir.ljer 6, 1936.) 

Argentine wool clip for 1936-37, coT,i;.iorcially e'stinated at 
343, 000, Oj.) pounds coia iared Tvith 340,000,000 pounds for 1935-36. 
Gerry-over estimated at 13,000,000 pounds and local consunption at 
57,000,000 po-onds, leayine, oxortaole suJ^plur, of 309,000,000 pounds. 
Baenos Aires office estiiaates production this year at 373,000,000 
pounds compajred V7ith 359,000,000 pounds for 1935-36. (Asi"! cultural 
Attach.i Paul 0. ilyrriis, Buenos Aires, fjovenber 3, 1936.) 



Novem'ber 9, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 

CHOP AND MARKET TEOSPECTS 



545 



^ . BEEAD GEAINS 

Arge ntine crop con dit ion s 

Excellent conditions prevail over 60 percent of the Argentine wheat 
area,, according to a ca"ble from Agric-altuT§i,l Attache P. 0. Nyhus at Buenos 
Aires based on ohservat ions made on a recent field trip. Conditions range 
from fair to good over 20 percent of the area, "but early drought has af- 
fected the remaining 20 percent, where despite rains of the past month 
prospects ■ are poor. The second official estimate of the total area sown 
for the 1936-37 wheat crop was placed at 17,359,000 acres. Since the acre- 
age lost this season is unusually small, present crop conditions indicate 
a total outturn of from 239,000,000 to 246,000,000 hushels. In the southern 
and central parts of the Province of Buenos Aires, which usually produces 
about 45 percent of the Argentine crop, growth is thick and rank with con- 
ditions the best of the year. Rgports for the Province of Santa Ee and the 
eastern sections of the Province of Cordoba are aLnost as favorable. Con- 
siderable yellow-stripe rust has infected the crop of southern and western 
Buenos Aires, but yields are not expected to be adversely affected. Heading 
is general in the northern part of the wheat zone but has not yet started in 
the south. 

The Shanghai wheat market 

The sowing of winter wheat has been delayed in the Yangtze Valley and 
in North China by the dry weather which prevailed during the second half of 
October, according to a radiogram from the Shanghai office of the Bureau of 
Agricultural Economics. The Provinces of Honan and Hupeh were most seriously 
affected, but conditions were causing concern in parts of Hopei, northern 
Shantijjig, and the lower Yangtze Provinces. A continuation of drought condi- 
tions not only would result in a reduction of the 1937 wheat acreage but 
would also retard the early growth of the crop. 

Arrivals of domestic wheat at Shanghai have been restricted because 
of the "'oncertain prospects for the new crop and because farmers believe the 
present good prices will continue. Stocks on hand declined to about 400,000 
bushels, but there was a slight increase in flour supplies, which were 
estimated at 800,000 bags. The demand for flour continued to be good in the 
Yangtze Valley and in South China, but it has fallen off in Manchuria. It 
is reported that 1935-36 imports of flour into Bairen are expected to be 
smaller than the total for 1934-35. Japanese flour was cheaper than other 
foreigTL flours available, and most Manchurian imports during the remainder 
of the season probably will bo from Ja.pan. Although a sm^ill purchase of 
United States flour was reported, similar transactions are not expected in 
the near future . 



546 



Toreign Crops and . Mar ke t s Vol. 33, No. 19 

CHOP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



Australian wheat v/as quoted in Shanghai during the last week of 
October at 122 cents per "bushel, which was somewhat under the price of the 
preceding week. Spot domestic wheat of the best quality remained a.t 97 
cents. Futures ranged from 98 cents for November delivery to 104 cents 
for March. The spot price of domestic flour was 111 cents per bag of 49 
pounds, the November future, 110 cents, and March, 113 cents per bag. As 
in 1935, September imports of wheat into China originated in Australia, but 
this year they totaled only 185,000 bushels as against 722,000 bushels last 
year. China's imports of flour for the month v/ere reported as follows, last 
yea.r's comparisons appearing in parentheses: Prom _ Australia. 14,000 barrels 
(20,000), Canada 8,000 (16,000), Japan 1,000 (3,000), United States 2,000 
(5,000), total 25,000 barrels (45,000). Exports of wheat from China during 
July- September amoimted to 711,000 bushels as against 102,000 bushels ex- 
ported in the corresponding period of 1935-36, Exports of flour during the 
same periods were 68,000 and 1,000 barrels, respectively. 



TOBaCCO 

T he tobacco situation in the Orient 

Consumption of American flue-cured tobacco in China, Japan and 
Manchuria has decreased during the past 3 years, but some increase is ex- 
pected during 1936-37, according to information received from Assistant 
Agricultural Commissioner J. Barnard Gibbs, at Shanghai. A considerable 
volume of the American flue-cured tobacco consumed during the past 2 seasons 
was taken fromi stocks. The carry-over of American and native flue-cured 
tobacco on October 1, 1936, was considerably below that normally carried 
for the present volume of consumption. Purther depletion of stocks is not 
likely, A record production of flue-cured tobacco for 1936 is expected in 
the oriental countries. The increased output will be below consumption 
requirements of 1936-37, however. It is e^qpected that the larger part of 
the deficit will be covered by imports of American leaf, v/hich are likely to 
exceed the low imports during the past 2 seasons, but will be materially 
below 1933-34 and the lO-year average of 1924-1933. 

Production of flue-cured tobacco in China, Japan, and Manchuria, is 
being encouraged by the respective Government agencies of these countries, 
and the substitution of native toba.cco for American is expected to take 
place in subsequent years. The anticipated increase of consumption is not 
likely to be as great as the increase in production, with the resulting 
adverse effect on imports of flue-cured tobacco from the United States. 



ITo-vemlDer 9, 1936 
CROP 



J'oreign Crops and Markets 
AND MARKET PROSPECTS, 



C 0 N T>D 



547 



China 

Chinese imports of American flue-cured leaf during the year ended 
September 30, 1936, were estimated at only 20,000,000 pounds. In 1936-37 
they are likely to "be around 40,000,000, provided no further decrease in 
stocks takes place. The expected increase is due to lower stocks of American 
and Chinese leaf and an increased dem-and for cigarettes, resu.lting from a 
general rise in Chinese purchasing power. The present upv/ard trend in 
prices for Chinese tobacco is reducing the spread "between the price of 
Americpoa and Chinese flue-cured leaf. This trend is expected to continue 
as the season progresses, thereby encouraging greater imports. 

The 1936 Chinese flue-cured crop is estimated at 175,000,000 po-unds, 
compared with 155,000,000 pounds for 1935, and the highest prodaction on 
record. The quality of the crop is expected to be superior to that of the 
preceding y^ar, which, coupled with a strong demand for this tobacco for 
immediate use, is bringing about rising prices. Farther increase in cigar- 
ette consujnption is expected in 1936-37, and flue-cured requirements for 
cigarette manufacture are placed at 180,000,000 pounds. The quantity of 
domestic flue-cured available for the Chinese cigarette output during the 
1936-37 season is estimated at 130,000,000 pounds. This figare is obtained 
by allowing for a redrying loss of 12,000,000 pounds and by estimating the 
exports, principally to Manchuria and Japan, at 33,000,000 pounds. About 
5,000,000 pounds of sun-cured will be added to the 130,000,000 pounds flue- 
cured, making a total su.pply of 135,000,000 pounds of Chinese leaf. This 
leaves a deficit of approximately 45,000,000 for 1936-37 required consumption. 
Of this volume, the share in the imports from the United States might be ex- 
pected to reach 40,000,000 pounds. 

It is now believed that there will be an increase in flue-cured acre- 
age in 1937, and cigarette manufacturers might possibly further reduce stocks 
in anticipation of satisfactory yields and a total leaf production near 
future requirements. On the other hand, stocks of tobacco held by dealers 
are very low at present and it is probable that they will import larger 
quantities then last year to meet any increased demand from manufacturers 
for the 1936-37 crop year. 

In the season just ended, 119,000,000 pounds of the 155,000,000 
pound Chinese crop were available for cigarette manufacture, the redrying 
loss having amounted to 10,000,000 pounds and exports to 26,000,000 pounds. 
The total consumption of cigarette tobacco last year reached 175,000,000 
pounds. The difference between that amo-ant and the 119,000,000 pounds avail- 
able from the 1935 Chinese crop was made up of 31,000,000 pounds withdram 
from stocks, 22,000,000 pounds of imported tobacco from all sources, and 
3,000,000 pounds of native sun-cured leaf. 



548 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 53, llo. 19 

CROP AND MAEKET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



The Chinese Government is encouraging the expansion of acreage of 
flue-cured tobacco and is "believed to be working toward some form of a leaf- 
tobacco monopoly. In March 1P3 6 the Kwangtung P'rovincial G-overrjncnt estab- 
lished a .tobacco monopoly, vvith the approval of the Chinese National Govern- 
ment. Should the monopoly be extended, it is probable that it will be 
limited for the time being to Honan Province. There is a belief, however, 
that eventually the m.onopoly will extend to all tobacco -producing districts, 
as well as to im.ports of foreign tobacco. If a complete monopoly should be 
established, it would- further encourage domestic production and limit im,r)orts 
to small quantities needed for the production of high-grade cigarettes. 

Jauan 

A change in the consumer's preference from the old type mouthpiece 
to the modern non-miouthpiece cigarette is causing tobacco growers in Japan 
to shift from the production of native s\in-cured varieties to flue-cured lea^f. 
The flue-cured crop during 1930-1934 averaged 30,000,000 pounds annually, or 
20 percent of the total leaf crop, while the production of native types 
averaged 116,000,000 pounds, or SO percent of the total. The 1S36 crop of 
native types, exclusive of Chosen and pormosa, is estimated at 85,000,000 
poiinds as compared with 91,000,000 for 1935. The 193 6 flue-cured crop is 
estimated at 55,000,000 pounds as against 51,000,000 pounds a year ago. 

It is estimated that a total cons'umption of tobacco in Japan, exclusive 
of Chosen and pormiosa, during the year ending September 30, 1957, will not ex- 
ceed 143,000,000 pounds, "or will be about the same as during 1935-36. An in- 
crease of 3,000,000 pounds in the 1936-37 flue-cured req^uiremcnts is expected 
because of the larger consumption of m.odern non-moiith-oiecc cj --.arettes . In 1935-^ 
the volume of leaf used, in the manufacture of this type of cigarette amounted 
to 62,000,000 pounds. 

Although total carry-over of stocks of flue-cured leaf held by the 
Japanese tobacco mionopoly is equivalent to from 15 to 20 mionths ' supply, the 
increasing df^mand for cigarettes in v/nich fluR-cu:'-on is used may result in 
larger imports of Ainericaji leaf. United Statss c>'port3 of flue-cured leaf to 
Japan during the year ended Juno 30, j-93h , ' a^ucujjted to 6,702,000 pounds com- 
pared with 9,370,000 pounds in 1954-35, and an ' ;;,.cuual 5-year average of 
7,753,000 pounds for 1929-30 to 1933-34. On the whole, tha shift in Japan to 
'^-igarcttes made lai'gely of flue-cured leaf will be accomplished, to a. very con- 
siderable extent, through increased domicstic production of this type of tobacco. 

Manchuria 

Cigarette consumption in Manchuria ha? increased rapidly during recent 
years. It was estimated that in 1935-36 it was double that of 1931-32. The 



IToreraber 9, 1936 loveign Crops and Markets 

CROP A U D MARKET PROSPECTS, 



C 0 IT T'D 



549 



total supplv of flue- cured tobacco available for the manufactare of cigarettes 
in 1935-36 axnouated to 35,500,000 pounds. It consisted of 4,500,000 pounds 
of domestic leaf, 4,000,000 pounds imported from the United States, and 
28,000,000 paands imported from other sources, principally from China. The 
quantity of tobacco actually used daring the year is estimated at 35,000,000 
pounds . 

In recent years the imports of American tobacco used in the manufacture 
of cigarettes has declined materially to approximately the level of 1931, 
notwithstanding the large increase in cigarette consumption. Average annual 
imports from the United States during the period 1931-32 to 1934-35 were ap- 
proximately 13,000,000 pounds as against 4,000,000 pounds in 1935-36. Per the 
1935-37 season, imports of American tobacco are forecast at 5,000,000 pounds. 

An increase in the production of American types of tobacco is expected 
in 1937 end subseqiaent years. The Hanchurian C-overnment is undertaking a 
20-year plan for tobacco production with a view to making the couatry practi- 
cally self-s"afficient in cigarette tobacco. Tobacco growers are to be assisted 
financiall:/ and are to receive instiuctions in proper cultivation and curing 
of tobacco. 



UiTITED STATES: Exports of flue-cured tobacco to specified countries, 

1923-24 to 1935^-36 



Year 


China aj 


Japan 


Otner 
countries 


Total 






Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 






pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


■pounds 


1925-24 




55,097 


11 , 255 


201 , 614 


265,966 


1924-25 




47,567 


8,157 


151,953 


207,457 


1925-26 




96, 268 


8,205 


219,892 


524,565 


1925-27 




71,760 


8,555 


208 , 358 


288,671 


1927-28 




68 , 842 


11,555 


248,527 


328,924 


1928-29 




131,254 


14,564 


268,131 


413,949 


1929-50 




128,144 


10,595 


291,403 


429 , 942 


1950-31 




145,942 


11,604 


277 , 142 


432,688 


1931-32 




77,456 


4,128 


203,925 


285,467 


1932-33 




76, 607 


4,755 


188,520 


269, 662 


1933-34 




87,029 


7,755 


235,5-18 


550 , 550 


1934-55 b/ 




28,976 


9,570 


206,128 


244,474 


1935-56 b/ . . . . 




24,059 


6,702 


292,051 


522,792 


Compiled from M 


onthly Summary of Poreign Commerce of the United States and 



official records of the Bureau of Poreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Includes Hongl.<:ong and Kwantung. b/ preliminary. 



550 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, ITo. 19 

CEO? A J? D MARKET P R 0 S P E C T S , C 0 N T 'D 



'/ Lim<:IOCK, IvSAT, AUD T700L 

Danulje Basin makes plans for r etaini n g lard export market s 

Cu-rrency restrictions in certain European coimtries co.iiDined vdth the 
reductions in American supplies because of the 1934 and 1936 droughts have 
created particularly favorahle outlets for Danuhian lard in European markets 
in the ijast 2 j^ears, according to a report to the B-ureau of Agric-olturaJ. 
Economics from its Belgrade office. 

Total Danxibe Ba.sin lard exports during the calendar year 1935 reached 
25,000,000 po-ands compared vdth 35,000,000 pounds in 1934 and with the aver- 
age of 14.000,000 pounds annually d-uring the 5 years 1929-1933. Exports 
during the first 7 months of 1936 amoiuited to 47,000,000 pcands compared 
with 44,000,000 poimds during the corresponding period last year. Hungary 
is hy far the most importaJit exporter. E:cports from Yugoslavia have "been 
increasing, out those from Bulgaria' and Rumania are relatively small. Most 
of the exports are going to Germany and Czechoslovakia under the provisions 
of special agreements with those cao.ntries wherchy Danuhian lard is taken 
in exchange for exports of chemicals, machinery, and other industrial 
products. Recently, however, increasing q_uantities have "been shipped to 
the United Kingdom and other co-antries. 

The Danuhian G-overnments are now making preparations for the permanent 
retention of these markets and to that end are concentrating not only upon 
further quality improvement for pure lard "but also on the production of a 
neutral lard sim.ilar to the American product. Up until 1930 the "bulk of 
the Eanuhian lard exports moved out mainly in the form of unrendered fat 
sides, due largely to uncontrolla'ble va^riations in the quality of the open- 
- kettle rendered lard, which proved o"bj ectionahle in escport markets. TTith the 
conclusion of special trade agreements and harter arrangements with near'by 
markets, ohligatory export standards were set up for such lard. Since that 
time rendered lard exports have "been increasing. 

Despite positive results already gained, Danuhian lard exporters 
recognize that it will "be difficult for their rendered lard to compete with 
the Anerican refined product when normal conditions of trade are restored. 
Having gained a footing in the German, Czechoslovak, and English markets, how- 
ever, during the recent American drought years, Plungarian and Yugoslav exporters 
hope to "be a'ble to continue competing with American lard in those and other 
foreign markets not only "by concentrating further on improvements in the 
quality of their rendered lard exports out also hy the production of a more 
highly refined lard. 0"bligatory export standards for such lard have already 
oeen adopted "by Hungary. 



NoveiTibT 9, 1936 



Fore if -n Crops .-3.nd Markets 



551 



AnPIClTLT^v^AL II1P0RT3 0? TlPj] UTTIT'F'.D STATES, 1935-36 

A;:r ioM Itur'dl oro'^'ij.cts imoo"^te^ into the United States during the 
year ended June 30, 1936, were valued at $1 , 139 ,9'i9 , 000 . This represents 
a rise of |;5?6 , 000 , 000 froin the low -noint of th^; depressi on, reached dur- 
inf', the ^isoal year 193?-33, and is slirhtly over half of the average an- 
nual valrie. of farn iranorts during the 5 pre-de"»i'ession years, 19'^4-S5 to 
1928-39. 



UI^ITJID STATl:S: 



Value of ap:r 
19 



cultural im^rts comDared with total, 
9-1936 a/ 







: Aru-'ioultu 


ral excluding-' forest nroducts 












: Oorapotitive 


: Forest 


Tear ended . 
June 30 ! 


Total 
imports 


: Total : 


Hon-com- 

petit ive 


; Yalu.e 


; Percent • 
:of total 
: agri- 
: c/iltural 


loroducts 
1/ 




l.Iillion 


: Mill ion : 


:.lillion 


. Million 




. I.Iillion 




dollars 


: dollars : 


dollars 


: dollars 


: Percent 


: dollars 


1929 : 


4,292 


: ~27iW : 


" 1,14-7 


: ],031 


: 47.3 ; 


222 


1930 : 


3 , 349 


: 1,900 : 


1,011 


: 389 


: 46.8 


: 21'^ 


1931 : 




: 1,162 : 


r i-^o 


: 512 


: 44.1 ; 


143 


1932 : 


1,730 


: 834 : 


459 


: 3'75 


: 45.0 


: 105 


1935 : 


1,168 


: 614 : 


331 


; 28 3 


: 46 . 1 • 


66 


1934 c/ : 


1,674 


r 83S : 




: 419 , 


: 49.9 


: 109 


1935 c/ : 


1 , 7>39 


: 934 : 


436 


498 


: 53.3 : 


: 106 


193C prel. c/: 




: 1.1-0' : 




: 640 


56.1 


I'^i^. 


Co^apilen i'7'oi;i 


V.cr thly S; 


I'.^rriarT'- of 7 


orei:.-n Oor 


'iTTioree of 


the IMitec 


States, June 


issues, and offici-il roc orris of T?\i 


reau of Foreif-n and 


Domestic Comn'jrce, 



a/ Agricultural products are general iiuoorts through June 30, 1933, excepting, 
vrool, ^vhere imnort'^' for consuin-nt ion havo been used in order to shovj the de- 
^^re.j of cor-r,et it iveness . Excludes distilled liquors vThich are classified as 
non-^agr icultural . h/ Indudes only snccified forest products, see annual 
tahle, pages 555 to 575, inclusive, c/ Imports for consumTjt ion. 

In considering the s if;n. if icanco of agricultural imoorts to the American 
farmer, it in inportant to separf-ite t)roduct3 such as coffee, cocoa, rubher, 
silk, and tea, in 'r/hich he is interested elmost e:^cluEively as a consumer , 
from products such as sugar, wool, troTDicsl oils, hidt'S and skins, fodders and 
feeds, and tobacco, in which his interest is partially that of e co-npeting 
nroducer. Ai^r icultural imports heve, therefore, been classified into two such 
grou.ps, called "non-cor.pot it ive" and "competitive", respectively. Products 
have boe.n classed as non-compet itive if thoy eire not T'roduc^'.d corrroercially by 
American farmers end are not directly substituted to a significant extent for 
comraodit i^^s v;hir>h are so produced, "Border-line" cases have usually been 
placed in the competitive groTip, _a/ Of the totil value of United States 
agricultural imports during 1935-35, 44 p'^rccrt or t>500,000,000 were non- 
competitive item-s, while 56 percent or $640,000,000 wer-.-; coripet it ive . 



a/ For a further discussion o: 
Markets" for May 4, 1936. 



this classification seo "Foreign Crops and 



552 



Poreiga Crops and Ivlaifeets 



Vol. 33, to. 19 



ac-pjcuIj1Ural iMPcms o? tte uiiiiEr' sa-iris, 1935-S6, coipt^d. 

The changes in imports of individual c 0:0.1:1 odi ties in 1935-36 cis com- 
pared rith the precedin-g fiscal year have l:een due to a combination of fac-. 
tors. ■ Inports of such product^; as hay, oats, and other feedst-iaffs decreased 
vrith the passing of the ;i.arketing season following the drought of 1934. lie- 
ports of l?lve cattle and rceats rose to supplement lovf domestic production 
follo^ving the feedstvdTfs shortage of the precediiig year. Imports of raw ma- 
terials, such as'\70ol, hides arid skins, x^egetatle oils and oilseeds, arid 
cotton, rose v/ith the recovery in dor.estic industrirJ. activity, There also 
was a rise in in:ports of wheat, i^iich suffered from unf evorable crop con- 
ditions in 1935, 

C ompetitive 

Sugar and mclar.se s made up 27 percent of the value of ccT^petitive 
farm imports, vegetahle oils ar.d oileeeds ^0 percent, hides and skins 9 per- 
cent, grains and flour 8 percent, meats and aiximal oils 5 percent, fruits 
and nuts 4 percent and dutiable "rrcol 4 percent. 



Value of leading competi 


tive agricultural i;.Tpcrts, 19 


34-35 and 1935-36 


(Eanked 


in order of importance in 193 


5-35) 


Commodity 


: 1934-35 


: 1935-36 




' Thousand dollars, 


- Thous-^nd aollai's 






: 160 , .^o-^ 


Fheat, 3xccpt for milling in 


hond : 11,460 


; " 27,342 






26,573 


Wool, dutiable 




22,747 




; 14,858 


22 , 121 






19 , 22<0 


Gattl.e hides and calf skins. 


: 7,219 


17,683 




; 14,730 


14,538 




i 10,703 


13,117 




: 6,483 


12,936 






11,892 






11,399 






11,352 




4,635 : 


11.150 



Oomijilod from official records of the Bureau of Poreign and Domestic Ccm- 
laerce and tha Uxiited States Tariff Commiasion. 



.Sugar and . molasses 

Of the competitive products, sijgar is the most important single item. 
In 1935-36, imports of rs.v sugar amounted t-o 3,217,000 short tons in conrparisCJn 
with 3,367,000 tons in 1934-35. This vras a decrease of 4 percent in volxiDe 
hut. since this sugar ve-s purchased at higher prices, there was a gain in valUO' 
of 29 percent. Cuha supplied 2,322,000 tons or 72 percent of the imported 
_s"j^ar. This was a sinaLl decline when compared with 1934-35 imports from Cuta^ 



November 9, IS 35 



Toreign Crops and Markets 



553 



AGRICULTURAL IMPORTS OF THE UinTED STATES, 1935-36, COKT'D 

which amo'unted to 2,736,000 tons. Imports from the Philippines reached 
842,000 tons or 26 percent of the total imporcs, a gain over 1934-35 when 
592,000 tons Cr3jr.e from that source. Total edible molasses imports rose this 
year, "but the imports of inedible molasses were under those of the 2 preced- 
ing years, the total standing at 195,175,000 gallons. 

Vegetable oils an d o ilseed s 

All vegetable oils and oilseeds taken together rank second only to 
sugar. In 1935-36, imports of oilseeds were valued at $34,764,000 as against 
$28,127,000 the preceding year. Most of this increase was accounted for by 
heavier imports of copra. Imports of hempseed increased to 110,929,000 
pcands, a gain of 70 percent over 1934-35. The United States imported much 
less sesajne seod this year than last, the total p^mounting to 118,083,000 
poiands. A development of the last few months has been the gain in imports 
of babassu nuts. Eor the 6 months, January-J^one 1936 imports stood at 
40,029,000 pounds with a value of $1,193,000. Practically all of these im- 
ports came from Brazil, Prior to J^^-nunry 1936, imports of baba.ssu nuts 7/ere 
comparatively unim.portant . 

nearly all of the vegetable oils show increases' over those of a year 
ago, the total value, $90,229,000, representing a gain of 67 percent over 
1934-35 imports. Imports of tung oil, which in 1934-35 amounted to 112,372,000 
pomds, had increased to 149,893,000 pounds during the year ended June 30, 
1936. This exceeded the previous high record reached in 1929-30 by 18,952,000 
po^jnds. Approximately 90 percent of the tung oil comes from China. The 
United States also im.ports a large volume of coconut oil, the total increasing 
from 300,759 , 000 po'unds last season to 348,571,000 poxinds in 1935-36. Imports 
of palm oil, which come largely from, the Netherland East Indies, British ^est 
Africa, and the Selgian Congo, rose from 193,412,000 pounds last year to 
326,719,000 pounds during the fiscal year 1935-36. Imports of perilla oil 
rose from 42,002,000 pounds in 1934-35 to 113,765,000 pounds in 1935-35. 

Grains and feedstuff s 

A general decline in feedstuff imports occurred in 1935-36, with the 
passing of the feed shortage caused during the preceding fiscal year by the 
drought of 1934. Imports of feedstuffs were valued at $7,830,000 in 1935-36 
as compared with $14,613,000 in 1934-35. All varieties of feeds shared in 
the decline. Eor similar reasons, rye imports declined sharply. TTneat, on 
the other hand, was imported in increased quantities, due to heavy rust 
damage to the 1935 crop. 

Meats, animal oils, and wool 

Meats and onimal oils registered gains when compared with 1934-35. 
Imports of canned beef increased from 69,489,000 pounds last season to 



554 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33 » No. 19 



AGRICULTURAL IMPORTS OF THE UNITED STATES, 1335-36, CONT'D 

88,192,000 pounds . in 1935-36. Imports of fresh and cured pork were substan- 
tially larger than a year ago, amounting to 8,122,000 and 14,947,000 pounds, 
respectively. Dutiable wool imports rose from 27,466,000 pounds to 
101,209,000 pounds. 

Dairy products 

Imports of cheese rose moderately, amounting to 49,380,000 pounds- 
Romano or Pecorino, the most im.portant type, amounted to nearly one-third of 
the total imports, or 14,415,000 pounds. Imports of the Emraenthaler and 
Provoloni types dropped, off. Much less butter was imported this year than 
last, the total falling from 22,393,000 pounds in 1934-35 to 5,855,000 
pounds during the fiscal year just closed- 

No n - compe t i t i v e 

Coffee, cmde rubber, raw silk, cacao beans, wool (in bond for the 
manufacture of carpets, etc.); tea, and bananas m-a]-:e up the bulk of the non- 
competitive imports, all of which recorded gains over the imports of a year 
earlier. The total value of non-competitive agricultural imports stood at 
$499,666,000 in 1935-36. Imports of coffee, the most imr.ortant item of the 
non-competitive group, amounted to 1,852,988,000 pounds valued at $135,946,000, 
a new all-time record. Imports of cacao beans advanced to 570,957,000 pounds, 
also a peak figure. 

Value of leading non- competitive agricultural imports, 1934-35 and 1935-36 

(Ranked in order of importt^nce in 1935-36) 



Commodi ty 



Coffee, except into Puerto Rico 

Rubber 

Silk, unmanufactured 

Bananas 

Cocoa or cacao beans 

Wool, free in bond for the manufacture 

of carpets , etc 

Tea 

Sisal and henequen 



1934-35 


1935-36 


Thousand dollars 


Thousand dollars 


135, 168 


135,946 


112,922 


125,920 


74,616 


99, 558 


26,593 


27,412 


24,384 


26,142 


11,958 


21,988 


17,172 


17,323 


5,243 


12,719 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce 
and the United States Tariff Commission. 



Imports of raw silk amounted to 61,145,000 pounds, a gain over those of 
1934-35 by a very small margin, but they were made at higher prices, represent- 
ing a gain in value of 33 percent. T/ool imported under bond for manufacture 
into rugs, carpets, etc. reached a total of 146,178,000 pounds, the highest 
since 1928-29. 



November 1936 Foreign Crops aiid Markets 

AC-RICULTUEAL MD FOREST PRODUCTS: Imports (for consiimption) into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-36 



Year ended June 30 



Commodity imported 


Unit 


' Quantity 




Value 




1935-36 




1935-36 






J, O — O tj 


prelim. 


19.14-35 


! "P. T' P 1 i rrt . 


GOI^IPETITIVE 










1 , 000 


; ' 1 , OuD 


ANIMALS AI^ID Aini\:AL PRODUCTS: 




. Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


. dollars 


Animals, live: 














Cattle- 






















12 


R07 


; 1,004 


D''J t. i ,--! "hip ( "h V wp "1 p'h f. ^ — 




Less than 700 l"b» each- 


No. 


■ 180 


a/ 


125 


3,741 


is/ 2 , 071 


Less than 175 lb. e3.ch 


No . 


b/ 


.c/ 


■ 35 




■ c/ 485 


175 lb. and less than 














700 lb. each 


No . 


' ^/ ■ 
. / „. 


c/ 


112 


b/ 


; c/ 1,475 


Total less than 700 lb 


. No. 


180 


272 


2 , 741 


; 4,031 


700 poimds or more, each- 


No . 


53 


5:/ 


16 


3,195 


: a/ 594 


Cows for dairy purposes 


No. 
No . 


■ ■ b / 

■ b/ 
^ 


c/ 

/ 


3 

130- 


b/ 

1 ..ii/ 


; c / 144 
: c/ 6.119 


Total 700 lb. or more 


No . 


53 


149 


3. 195 


: 6,857 


Total cattle (dutiable) 


No. 


233 


421 


5,936 


; 10,888 


Hogs- 








d/ 








No . 


d/ 




i 


; T 
; X 




liD . 


50 




9 ,903 


4 


: 875 


Sheep— 














For breeding 


No . 


1 




2 


37 


44 




rJO . 


4 




5 


23 


34' 


C-oats- 












d'/ 


For b'^eedinf" ... 


No. 


I./ 






d/ 




No . 


d/ 




3 


d/ 


4 


PoiiTtr\'' 1 i VP— 
















Lb. 






6 


X 


1 


0th PT* Timi 1 1 w 




P 1 






16 


72 


Horses— 




d/ 

'J, / 
















1 




.'^26 










17 




JL , t/ Cri 








immeciiate slci'is^'Titfi^r* » v ..... . 


No. 


: 




7 


15 


22 


Ass da and 'burros- 
















iJo. 


d/ 




0 


^ 


0 




No. 


d/ ■ 




2 ' 


d/ ^ 

16 


5 




No . 


d/ 




92 




No. 


t' • 






2 


1 




No. 


11 • 




i/ 


3 . 


3 


Other animals for breeding. 
















No. 


d/ 




d/ 


2 • 


d/ 








7,741' 


15,326 



Gont 



inued - 



556 



Foruign Crops cJid Mr.rkets 



Vol, 33, ITo. 19 



AC-Hi CUlTUEAL aIjD i'OBSST PBODUCTS; Imports (for cons-aniptioa) into 
the United States, 19b4-35 arid 1935-36, cont'd 







Year ended 


June 30 




COiruiiodity imported 


Unit 


•Quantity 


Value 








1335-36 




. 1935-36 






1934-35 


prelim. 


; 1934-35 


; prelim. 


CGiviPiTITIYE 








; 1,000 


; 1,000 


MIlvlALS Aim ASIiviAL PHODUCTSjCONTri 




Thousands 


Thousands 


; dolla-rs 


; dollars 


DeAry products; 














Lb. 
Lb. 


22,393 
1,784 


5,855 
11,396 


3,519 
156 


; 1,124 

i 697 




Cheese- 




Swiss- 












iinmijnthaler , with eye 














Lb. 
Lb. 


6, 754 


5,821 
d ^^24 


1 , 710 
: U 


: 1,599 
k/ 195 






Lb. 


6,734 


6,d05 


1,710 


; 1.794 


0 ther— 












Blue mold (original loaves) 


Lb. 


1/ 


,11 241 


i/ 


'11 4o 


Cheddar (original loaves) 


Lb. 


^1 


c/ 3,834 


d 


c/ 494 . 




Lb. 

T "h 


1/ 


d 1,183 
5,113 
2,938 


d 

1 , 421 

495 


,d 138 
1,033 
; 562 




7,026 
2,281 


LT fr "1 o lO r*', o "O O TTnO O Tl 




Ld . 


14 , 640 


14 , 415 


3,498 


• 4,142 




Lb. 


2,533 
15 , 232 


1,879 
13 , 272 


891 


678 




Lb. 


2. 629 


2.445 


Total otrier tnan Swiss .. 


Lb. 


41 , 712 


42,875 


8,934 


9,558 




LD, 


43 ,446 


45 , 380 


10 , 644 


11 ,352 


Milk and cream- 












Whole , skimmed, or buttermilk 


(j-al. 


23 


42 


5 


9 




Gal. 


1 


7 


1 


9 


Condensed and evaporated- 








In air-tight containers- 














Lb. 
Lb . 


155 


204 
24 


9 


11 
2 




25 


3 


n 1 1 r^ 4* .~i ^ 


lib. 




R 




oo 


Total condensed end 












P VP'~i D"^" T, p r] 




400 


1 . 116 


32 


46 


■ Driod, malted, etc- 














Lb. 


1,463 


3,373 
12,074 
359 

d 

4 


100 


266 




Lb. 


1 


d 

0 


457 




Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 


0 


17 




0 


0 


d 


Malted milk, compounds, etc. 


3 


1 


1 


Total dried, malted 












milk compounds, etc.... 


Lb. 


1,467 


15,810 


101 : 


741 










14,458 • 


14.178 



Continued - 



November 9, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



557 



AGRICULTURAL FOREST PROLOCTS : Imports (for ccn^nrptlon) int 
the United States, 1934-35 and 193&-35, cont""' d 









Year ended 


June 30 




Conimodity imported 


Unit 


_^j^an 


tity 


Yalue 




. 1935-36 




1935-36 






: 1934-35 


; prelim . 


, 1934-35 


■ prelim. 


COfv'IPETITIVE 








1,000 


: 1,000 


MIIvLALS & AlTIIvL^J. PROLUCTS, CONT'D; 




■ Thousandfi 


! ThnuKands 


dollars 


; dollars 


Eggs and egg products: ; 












Eggs in ti'ie shel] . ■ 


Tin "7 






70 


i 53 


Eggs whole- : 














T "K 

LD . 


377 


; 43 r 


103 


; 138 




T "h 
Jj D . 


ft 


! n 

U 




: 0 


'W,p*sj' vol It Q— 












V)!^ "1 P ' 




T "lie 

3, lib 


; 4, 34y 


300 


; 682 


"l?7*n rr Q-n r* * 


LD . 


1 , OUb 


. bbo 


86 


: ■ 62 


Egg alDumen- ; 














Ld . 

liD . 


1 , 140 

0 


2, (^13 


498 

0 


: 375 
: d/ 










1,057 


: 1 , 811 


Hides & sicins, raw (eiitcerit furs) : ■ 



























liD . 




1 , Ou^O 


167 


274 


Other bjff alo ... 


T,h 


vj O ^ 




85 


; 116 




Ld . 


1 , 575 


2 ,480 


252 


390 
















T "h 
JjD . 


voO 


3, 610 


239 


944 


Wet terl ! 








1. 575 


2,420 






X J. , y O i7 




1.914 


, 3,364 


OttTiiixe mcLes— 














LD . 


/ITT 


6,(0/ 


37 


464 


Wet =!al tPf] ' 


T "h 


D D , 1.0 D 


1 zi7 np t; 


6.868 


13,860 




ij U . 


PR Rf^^ 

00, 00 ( 


"1 r^n pp^n 

X>JU , o<- - 


5,905 


14,324 




Ld . 


djUU r 


0 0 T Q 

2, o<3o 


560 


958 


(To ?5t; sn j'l Iri r\ qVt n ci«. 1 












LD . • 


53, 3bb 


7 / , 038 


13,898 


21,281 


Green or ■nifVTft'^ 


T,"h ' 




tj , 00^ ' 


9 60 


840 


Total r^oat arK^ kifl "^Irinc; • 


T.h . 

JU l-* • 


60 71 4 




14.858 


22,121 


Horse, colt and a^sq hideq-. ' 












Dt'V snH rl'r''\'' ccil+or! I 


T "h ' 
L D . 


1 ^7 
lor 


n OP, 
■ 0 , OiJO 




206 


Wet salted : 


LL. : 


6.058 


12,749 


346 


054 


Total horse, colt, and | 














Lb. ; 


6,195 i 


15,002 


355 i 


1,060 




Lb. : 


856 ; 


1,379 


516 : 


817 


Kip skins- ; 














Lb. : 


206 : 


717 


29 : 


107 




Lb. : 


4,003 ; 


6,961 


555 ; 


1,024 


Total kip skins • 


Lb, ; 


4,209 •; 


7,678 • 


584 ; 


1.131 



Continued - 



558 



To reign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 19 



AGHlCirLTURAL AJID POESST PRODUCTS: Imports (for consumption) into 
the United States, 1954-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Year ended June 3C 



Commodity imported 



COIvIPETITIVS 
ANIMALS & ANIMAL PP.ODUCTS, CONT'D 
Hides and sk ins ,_ raw?.._.cont '.d.^ 
Sheep and lamo skins- 
Pickled skins 

Slats, dry, no wool 

Wooled, dry and green 

Total sheep & iamb skins . . 
Misc. hides & slcins, excl. , 
fish, reptile & seal skins . . 

Total hides and skins 

Meat s a nd meat products.; 

Beef and veal- 
Beef, fresh 

Veal, fresh 

Beef & veal, pickled, etc 
Beef , canned, incl . corned 
Total beef and veal . . . 

Mutton and lamb- 
Mutton, fresh 

Lamb , fresh 

Total mutton and lamb . 

Pork- 

Presh 

Hams, shoulders and bacon 
Pickled, salted and. other 

Total pork 

Poultry- 
Dead, fresh- 

T'arkeys 

All other poultry . 
Prepared or preserved 
Other meats - 

Presh 

Canned 

Prepared or preserved 

Total meats 

Meat extracts 

Sausage casings- 
Sheep, lamb and goat 

Other casings 

Total sausage casings 



Unit 



Quantity 



Value 











1935-36 




■ 1934-35 


• prelim. 




1934-55 


; prelim. 








1,000 


: 1,000 




Thousands 


; Thousands 


dollars 


■ dollars 


Lb. 


21,871 


27,402 


3,094 


5,227 


Lb. 


7,066 


10,088 


1, 645 


2,163 


Lb. 


5. 746 


10 . 8 62 


759 


1 . 387 


Lb. 


54, 683 


48, 352 


5,478 


8, 777 




5 . 079 


p/ 


1 .077 


1.546 


Lb. , 


211,814 




32,499 


54,288 


jj u « 




D ) X ox 




4-1 4 


Lb. 


40 


206 


4 


17 


Lb. 


1, 177 


1, 828 


89 


131 


Lb . 


69 489 


88 192 


4 "=95 


7. 815 


Jj u • 










Lb. 


15 


13 


2 


1 


Lb. 


15 


30 


2 




T,b 






4 




Lb. 


1,540 


8,122 


215 


1,167 


Lb. 


1,898 


14, 947 


503 


3, 872 


Lb. 


550 


2 , 313 


209 


617 


T h 




25Ji82 


927 


5, 656 


Lb. 


-3- ^ rvQ'«< — 1 

364 


194 


45 


27 


Lb. 


172 


242 


43 


56 


Lb. 


301 


373 


194 


199 


Lb. 


533 


915 


64 


115 


Lb. 


167 


377 


39 


69 


Lb. 




0 


d/ 


0 


Lb. 


81.259 


123.935 


6,552 


14.502 


Lb. 


312 


367 


149 


165 


Lb. 


7, 698 


5,141 


9,011 ; 


5,261 


Lb. 


. , 8,153 


8.207 • 


1.109 


1,252 


Lb. 


15.851 


13,548 • 


10,120 


6 , 513 



Continued ^ 



Novera'ber S, 1936 



foreign Crops and Ma.rkets 



559 



AIPJCULTUHAL Al^ID FOSEST KIODUCTS: Imports (for conswption) into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Year ended June 30 



Commodity imported ; 


Unit ; 


Quantity ■ 


Value 








1935-35 : 




1935-35 






1934-35 '■ 


prelim. ■ 


1934-35 \ 


-orelim. 


CClviriTxTI VJi 








1,000 ; 


1, 000 


AMIAIALS o: .-^ll-.AL PRODUCTS, COi'IT'D; 




Thousands, 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


'^ils ancL lats?, animal: ; 














LTj . : 


op \ 


17 


2 


2 




Lh. ; 


1,257 


11,459 


76 


629 




LI). 1 


1,542 . 


84 


124 


8 




Lb . 1 


5,989' ; 


■ ■ ' 7 , 036 


373 


517 




L"b . 1 


24 


156 


2 


16 




Lh. . 


4, 294 


3, 553 


328 


278 


m 1 1 — ' 














Lh. 




y 3,349 




1/ 184 




L"b . 




c/ 31, 130 


— — _ 


c/ 1,311 


Ti ^ ' 


Lh. 


185, 112 


a/97, 079 


8,915 


a/ 5,569 


t r- , 4. J- „ ' 


Lh . 


4, 025 


a/ 1,447 


171 


a/ 75 




Lh . 


190, 138 


133,005 


9 , 086 


7 , 639 


T7ool ^'^rease, inedilile i 


jjb . 


4, 531 


5, 883 


207 


294 


Pther \;rcases & oils,excl. fish; 




/ 

£/ 


e/ 


118 


75 


lotai ox is end ia,ts, animal. : 








10, 316 


b , 458 


Tot.al meats, meat products, ; 




















27 , 137 


30, 636 


TJ'ool & mO'iair, -ujimfd. (except ; 












ixoti xii uuij.o.y — aH.Co'Ua.L. rrei^3!!nT/; 












D on sko i , SmvrnG, , e t c . wi th out - 












Merino or Enfjlish "blood— 














L"b. 


3,282 


10,219 


; 423 


1,722 


■fashed, scoured, etc. . 


Lb. 


277 


1,540 


55 


305 


Other, not finer than 40 ' s- 












7ooleii t^'-t^e- 














Lh. 


3,83? 


6 , 452 


■ 459 


860 


7-. shed 5 Gcoured, etc. .. , 


Zjb . 


1,141 


1,620 


: 188 


304 


TTorsted t^pp- 

Irj. tl^e ^aeg© ....,....» ; 




• a/. 


•c/ 7,344 




:c/ 1,113 


7rvsV?-, rs^^-ur^d, ©t<j*,** '> 








367 




Vo. 


' 43 


: 336 


; 15 


124 


7a3hed, ^.coured, etc '. 


Lo. 


139 


201 


: 43 


56 


Totej. Donskoi , Smyrna., etc ^ 


Lb. 


8, 749 


29.507 


; 1,183 


4,851 


■^ther wools- \ 












7oolen t:rpe (Clothing vool)- 












40' s to 44' s- ; 












In the grease ■ 


Lh. 


117 


424 


; 24 


78 


hashed, scoured, etc.. ' 


Lb. 


79 


168 


■ 16 


32 



Continued - 



560 



Poreic-n Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, 1^0. 19 



AGRICULTURAL AMD FOREST PRODUCTS: Imports (for consi3Jnption) into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-35, cont'd 



Commodity imported 



COIviPSTITIVE 
AI^IMALS & Al^TIMAL PRODUCTS , CONT 'D 
Xlool & moligir, unmfd. (exce pt 
f ree in bond) Ac tual T/eigh t , conij i 
Other \70ols, cont'd. 

Toolen type (Clothing, cent ' d) 
44- 's to 56 's- 

In the grease 

"Tashed, scoured, etc. 
Piner than 56 's- 

In the grease 

Hashed, scoured, etc. 
Total vroolen type.. 
Torsted t7)'pe-( Corah ing \70ol 
40' s to 44 's- 

In the grease 

Tfashed, scoured, etc. 
44 's to 56 'b- 

In the grease 

V/"ashed, scoured, etc. 
Finer than 55 ' s- 

In the grease 

TTashed, scoured, etc. 
Total worsted type. 
Kair of the Angora goat (ivbhair") 
Hair of the Caslimore Alpaca, etc; 

TZool, carhoniscd 

Total w.'ol/.tnr") j'd (' except 
free if/. ■--r^ti^a.J. weigh 

Miscellar 3or ^ : .... :„iii..ijiu:1 



Beeswaz dc otL^r ar^i ,;al \7ax .. 
Blood, dried ( , ^-O Ih.) .... 

Blood alhuinon, dried 

Bones, hoofs and horns, -ormifd. 
Bristles- 

Crude, not sorted 

Sorted, "bunched, or prepared 

Feathers, crude 

Gelatin- 

Ediole 

Inedihle 



Unit 



Lh. 
Lh. 

Lh. 
Lh. 
Lh. 



Lh. 
Lh . 

Lh. 
Lh. 

Lh. 
Lh. 
Lh. 
Lh. 
Lh. 
Lh . 



Lh. 
Ton 
Lh. 
Lh. 



Lh. 
Lh. 
Lh, 

Lh. 
Lh. 



Year ended J-jJie 30 



Qi xantity 



■1234-35 



'hou sands T housands ' 



594 
1,981 

h/ 



2,556 
668 

10,517 




I^. 37.465 



4,331 
6 

112 
68,543 



4,390 
2,929 

1,498 
250 



1935-36 
prelim. 



4,312 
1,418 



c/ 1,089 
c/ 159 



7,570 



.6,759 
1,123 

26,779 
5,302 

c/ 20,041 
c/ 522 



50,6: 



101.209 



4,175 
9 

109 
95,465 

1 

5,452 
4,034 

2,405 
216 



Value 



1934-35. 



1,000 
dollars 



132 
479 



651 



379 
135 

2,575 

292 



h 



3,331 



2 

291 



5 5 



08 



834 
254 
32 
510 

7 

5,513 
1,075 

811 
63 



1935-36 
prelim . 



1, 000 
dollars 



c/ 



;c/ 5 , 852 
c'/ _218 



Continued - 



Novemlier 9) 193'3 



Foreiga Crops and Markets 



AGRICULTUHAL MW FOREST PRODUCTS: Imports (for consiMption) into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Year ended June 30 



Commodity imported 


Unit 


Ojuantity 


V^.lue 




1935-36 




1930-36 






1934-35 


prelim . 


1934-35 


prelim. 


OUlV.rJii i 1 i 1 vJIj 








1 , 000 


1,000 


AN iMALib & AiN ilviAJj Jt-KOJJUO i b , UOr! I'D. 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


Miscellaneous animal prod.. cont'd 














Lb , 


2,035 


2, 977 
31, 561 


190 


254 


Glue stock, hide cuttings , etc . 


Lb. 


24,468 


1, 156 


1,391 


Hair, "'onmanuf actured- 












Cattle hody hair, ordinary. . 


Lb. 


2, 667 


5, 455 


140 


341 


Horse hair, tails or manes.. 


JjD. 


2,055 


3,005 


600 


1 ,212 


/ I T" v» i~\ T r>-i O i L-\ <-\ -1 


IjD . 


2 , 199 


6, 723 


356 


1 ,059 


1 anKage o , o^tu xo.^. 


ion 


17 


47 


419 


1 , 508 


Other misc. animial products m/ 




e/ 


e/ 


73 


225 


Total animals & animal prod. 








100,434 


157,166 


VEG-ETA3LE PRODUCTS: 












Coffee imioorted into Puerto Rico 


Lb. 


981 


150 


123 


17 


Fibers, vegetable: 












Cotton, unrnfd.- (478 lb .bale) 












Raw, except linters- 












Staple under 1-1 /S inches. 


Bale 


37 


80 


1,557 


3,370 


Staple 1-1/8 to 1-3/8 " 


Bale 


41 


28 


2,982 


2,317 


Staple 1-3/8 inches & over 
Total rai!7, excl. linters. 


Bale 


38 


40 


3.331 


3,578 


Bale 


116 


148 


7 ,870 


y , e6o 




xSaie 


b/ 


cl 16 


b/ 


C / 281 


Total cotton, unmfd. . . . 


±)d.xe 


116 


164 


7,870 


9 , 546 


i lax ,unmi d. "( 2 , 240 lb. ton) 














Ton 


1 


1 


680 


976 




Ton 


3 


5 


1,129 


1 , 896 


TT ^ . „ -r',T O/li^i "IT- \ 


Ton 


1 


1 


165 


248 




Ton 


43 


73 


3,081 


6,500 


Jute butts, unmfd. (2,240 lb.) 


Ton 


6 


15 


226 


623 


Fruits and preparations: 












Fre sh- 














Bu. 


28 


5 


24 


6 




Lb. 


5, 622 


7,530 


99 


165 


Berries , natural or in brine. 


Lb. 


3,862 


3,853 


246 


246 


Cherries, natural, sulphured, 














Lb. 


1,492 





130 







lb. 


^/ 


n/ 1 , 400 




n/ 94 


Sulphured or in brine. . . 


Lb, 




c/ 145 


V / 

Sli 


C_/ 14: 


•Ci trus— 














Lb. 


7 , 646 

628 


3,904 
5,989 
9,824 


126 


67 




Lb. 


19 


127 




Lb. 


6,065 
1,857 

606 


169 


274 




Lb. 


3,997 


7a 


152 




Cu.ft. 


380 


5&7 


490 




e/ 
e/ 


el 


737 


aoi 






e/ 


4 


3 



Continued - 



562 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 19 



AGRICULTURAL M'D FOREST PRODUCTS: -Imports (for consumption) into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 







Year ended June 30 


Cominodity imported 


Unit 


Qiaantity 


Value 










X.V 0 D— 0 D 






1934-35 


prelim. 


1934-35 


prelim. 


UUivLriiil ill ViL 








1 , (JUU 


1 , UUU 


vi G-ii TABLib P RuDIj C T & , C ONT ' D : 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


do liars 


Fruits and preparations, cont'd. 












Dried- 














L"b. 


6,824 
53 , r8i 


6 , 214 

54 , (J5 ( 


/"IT 


OOD 




Lb . 


i , ( 


-1 0 PlQ 




Lb. 


5, 655 


6,381 


374 


419 


Raisins & other dried grapes 


Lb . 


952 


880 




80 


Prepared or preserved- 














Lb. 


26 


26 


5 


5 


Citron -or citron peel- 














Lb. 


1 ,005 


740 


115 


78 




Lb. - 


2 , 649 


3,085 


177 


206 




Lb. 


2,314 


2,036 


284 


253 


Olive s- 












In iDrine- 














Gal. 


4,271 


3,162 


2,048 


1,409 




Gal. 


2,551 


3,280 


1,693 


2,105 




Lb. 


169 


2,465 


15 


202 


Misc.f raits , natural or prep. .. 
Total- fruits cS-, preparations. 


Lb. 


13,482 

e/ 


9 , 823 

e / 


724 
1,073 


485 








11 , 279 


10 , 944 


Grains and grain products: 













Grains- 














Su. 


10,978 

0 T 
853 


648 


8,367 


428 




Lb . 


1 , lo<i 


X JL 






Su. 


20 , 4(d / 


31 , idti^ 




10 , 1 1 ( 


Oats (32 lb. ) 


Bu. 


15,614 


98 


4 , 557 


39 


Rice- 












Clcaned or milled 


Lb. 


CiZj , <jo.) 




on Q 
bio 


oil 


Paddy, uncleaned or "brown 


Lb. 


6 , 49 7 


3 , 654 


154 


114 


Patna 


Lb. 


3 , 252 


4,898 


113 


186 


Rye (56 Vo.) 


Bu. 


11 , 230 


• 2,245 


5,871 


1,067 












■l4,804 


Butiable at 42c TJer "bu. . . 


3u. 


5,906 


5,732 




Butialile at 10;ci ad val. . . . 












(Unfit for human 

consuraption) 


Bu. 


8,146 




5,729 




Milled in "bond for export- 














Bu. 


3,772 


4 , 123 


3,063 


3,604 




3u. 


7 . 292 


7.855 


5 , 634 


6,436 




Bu. 


• 25.116 


46,497 


20,158 


37 , 382 




Bu. 






50 , 752 


52 , 634 



Continued - 



November 9, 1936 



foreign Crops and Markets 



553 



AGrJ CULTIEj\L AM) JiOPoiST PHODUGTS: Imports (for consumption) into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Commodity imported 




Year ended 


June 30 




Unit 


Q.uantitv 


Value 






X V Ot:— 0<J 


; 1935-36 




: 1935-36 
■ prelim. 


CCfciPiTITIVE 








X , \J\J\J 


1 X , u u u 


YmZTABL^ PRODUCTS, COITT'D: 




ixi uu. s axiu. b 


, xnousano-s 


cLoxxars 


I dollars 


C-rains & C-rain products, cont'd- 












Lieals and flour- 












Oatmeal, rolled oats, etc... 


Lb. 


D OL 


2oU 


.-(CD 


I "I c 

; ic 


Rice flour, meal, etc 


Lb. 


42 , i.i)4 


38 , 328 


555 


■ 633 


l/Vhoat flour 


Bbl. 


4 


35 


19 


126 


Total grains aiid flour .... 








bi , 352 


. 53,411 


Miscellaneous grain products- 














Lo , 


C, {± , Oi. O 


O OP\ O Q 

<d , oby 


r , 004t 




Biscuits .wafers , cakes , etc... 








2oD 


1 291 




Lb. 




4 , loo 


248 


\ 316 


Macaroni, vermicelli, etc. .. 


Lb. 


1,360 


1,368 


114 


; 116 


Other grs.in products 




e/ 




289 


: 223 


Total misc. grain products 








8, 791 


7 , 5 72 


Peeds and fodders- 












Beet pulp, dried (2,240 It.) 
Bran, shorts & other by- 


Ton 


21 


24 


521 


540 


product feeds of wheat- 












Of direct import. (2240 Ih) 


Ton 


opt o 
2o2 


190 


5 , 414 


' 3,538 


"ffithdravm Donded mills " 


Ton 


(\J 




1 J ODD 


X , 357 


By-product f eeds , ex. wheat " 


Ton 


xu 


xU 




.-i22 


Grain hulls 

Hay (2, 000 Id.) 

Malt sprouts & "brewers' 


Lb. 

Ton 


OO , >J<oO 

88 


T C C Q Q 
X D , OC O 

5 


2oo 
861 


54 
42 


grains (2,240 lb.) 


Ton 


2 


1 


39 


17 


Mixed feeds (2, 240 lb.) 

Oilcake and oil- cake meal- 


Ton 


9 


6 


202 


121 




Lb. \ 


139 ,081 


36,553 


1,430 


399 


\^ w w Wi-'X.OL u \J S. O U U i. o^- 












Product of the P.I 


Lb. 


90,o48 . 


114,5 6? 


633 


883 


\j V J. J.W J- s.^ VJ \^ W ii- k.'- U W — \^ \J UJ. a « • 


T "h 




5? 


17 


1 


Cottonseed " 


Lb. 


xUi , _oo ; 


b , 309 


1 , 141 


5' 5 


Other oilcaico ar.o. mea.:! 


Lb. : 
Lb. . 


9 , 774 : 


20 , 223 
3 , 90? 


230 
94 


154 


'x'OtaT oil P?>"'>'p Jinn rnf'-l 


Lb. : 


366 , 730 


181,625 


o , 745 




Screenings, scalpings , chaff- 












Oi flaxseed 


Lb. : 


10,911 \ 


. 8,632 


33 


25 


Other then, flaxseed 






(2,240 lb.) 


Ton 


96 


61 


1 , 492 
244 


351 

36 


Straw (2,000 lb.) 


Ton 


59 : 


7 ' 


Total foeds & fodders o/ 








14,613 


7.830 


ioDS, hoD extract, and lupulin: 














Lb. 
' Lb. 


5 , 528 
^/ 


5,935 
cj 16 


2,997 




Hop extract and lupulin 


2 , 079 
c/ 28 



Continued - 



564 



Foreign Crops and ivia.rkets 



Vol. 33, No. 19 



AGxtlCULTUBAL AND JOHEST PRODUCTS: Imports (for consumption) into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 









Year ende 


d June 30 




Commodity imported 


Unit 


".quantity 


Value 






193D-36 '< 




1935-35 


• 




1934-35 


prelim. '. 


1954-35 : 


prelim. 


COiviPSTITlVE : 








1,000 : 


1,000 


VEGETABLE PHODuCTS, CONT'D; \ 




Thousands 


Thousands . 


dollars 1 


dollars 


Nut s : : 












Almonds- . | 














Lb. 


2,986 


9,93-7 


662 : 


2,042 




Lb, 


4 


2 , 731 




194 


Brazil or cr^sm nuts- : 














L"b. 


7,993 


10 , 149 


973 


1,319 




Lh. 


16,920 


23 , 385 


756 


976 




Lh. 


17,945 


21,166 


2,827 


3 , 600 


Chestnuts, incl. m^arrons 


Lb. 


14,844 


16,000 


571 


584 




No . 


58,735 


47,116 


898 


731 


Coconut meat, desiccated, etc.-; 












Product of the P.I : 


Lb. 


63,271 


74,764 


2,977 


3,882 




Lb. 


1,265 


814 


43 


37 


, I'ilherts- • 














Lb. 


2,094 


2,040 


361 


365 




Lb. 


2,438 


3,457 


174 


300 


Peanuts- : 














Lb. 


1 


a/ 1 




a/d/ 




Lb, 


21 


42 


2 


4-- 




Lb. 


333 


250 


7 


7 




Lb. 


377 


79 


85 


14 




Lb. • 


340 


358 


86 


78 




Lb. 


2,217 


3,538 


574 


817 


Vfelnuts- : 














Lb. 


5,632 


4,160 


898 


641 




Lb. 


30 


315 


3 


22 


Other nuts & nut preparations.. \ 


Lb. 


1,325 


1,091 


306 


280 


Total nuts & mt prep ; 








12 . 203 


15 . 995 


Oilseeds: ; 














Lb. 




c/40,029 


k/ 


cy 1,193 




Lb. 


79,553 


142,582 


1,567 


3,127 




Lb. 


327,269 


464,252 


5,541 


' 9 , 774 




Bu. 


15,332 


■15,388 


14,730 


' 14,588 




Lb. 


55 , 235 


110,929 


799 


: 1,385 




Lb. 


26,686 


2,516 


255 


• 32 


Palm nuts & palm nut kernels... ; 


Lb. 


" 43,084 


15,193 


568 


; 285 




Lb. 


: 2,875 


2,458 


51 


64 




Lb. 


; 8,505 


6,570 


446 


327 




Lb. 


; 28,390 


24,322 


; 621 


• 615 




Lb. 


: 146,408 


. 118,083 


: 3,401 


; 3 , 029 




Lb. 


; 5,824 


11,862 


: 138 


' 343 








• 28,127 


' 34,764 



Continued - 



llovein'ber 9, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



555 



AGHICULTUEUL- ML FOREST PRORJCTS: Imports (for consumption) into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Year ended June 30 



Commodity imported 


: Unit 


Qp.antit,y 


Value 




1935-36 




1935-36 






1934-35 


prelim. 


1934-35 


prelim. 


CO!/rPETITI^ 








1,000 


1 , 000 


1/EG-STABLE PHOLUCTS, GOIIT'D: 




Thou sands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


Oils: 












Sxpressed- 














Lh. 


9,038 


11,477 


2,141 


3,927 




' Lh. 


434 


147 


27 


10 




Lh. 


8 


14 


2 




Goeonut oil- 












product of the P .1 


Lb. 


300,749 


348,561 


8,487 


12,935 


Other 


Lb. 


10 


10 


1 


1 




Lb. 


20,296 


29,089 


1 , Q>72 


1 , 820 




Lb. 


113,354 


• 145,910 


5,567 


8, 533 




Lb. 


533 


220 


25 


12 




Lb. 


1/ 


'c/l 0,740 


W 


c/ 630 




Lb. 


3,085 


1,161 


119 


47 


Olive oil, edi"ble- 












In packages weighing 












less thsn 40 Its 


Lb. 


26,723 


25,480 


3,572 


3,361 




Lb. 


35,839 


42,765- 


4,290 


4,945 


Olive oil, inedihle- 














Lb, 


34,637 


24,098 


2,005 


1,499 




Lb. 


17,954 


12,445 


1,504 


1,135 


Palm oil 


Lb. 


193,412 


326,719 


4, 635 


11,150 


Palm kernel oil- 














Lb. 


6,134 


5,250 


207 


272 




Lb. 


26,798 


29,145 


898 


1,164 




Lb. 


59,928 


66,049 


2,411 


3,330 




Lb. 


42,002 


113,766 


2,598 


6,619 


Rape soed oil- 














Gal. 


3,188 


2,544 


1,010 


970 




Gal. 


1 577 


7 '^64 


536 


2, 993 


Sesame oil- 












EdiDle 


Lb. 






(do 




Tn R'li'hlG , 


T,b . 


11 


0 


1 


0 




T h 


11,344 


11,284 


466 


533 


&anflo\vsr seed oil- 












51d ihl e 


Lb . 


34,927 


23 , 682 


1,937 


1 , 580 




Lb. 


•216 


523 


11 


33 




Lb. 


112,372 


149,893 


8,197 


19,228 




Lb. 


124 


2,828 


6 


130 




Lb. 


3,399 


5,948, . 


238 


572 


Other oils & fats, exp.- 












Edihle 


Lb. 


9,280 


1,582 : 


373 


83 




Lb. 


18,383 


35.348 


1,182 


2.294 


Total oils & fats, exp . 








53.543 


89,829 



Continued - 



565 



foreign. Crops c?iid Markets 



Vol. 33, llo. .19 



AG-RI CULTURAIj MD FOSEST FEODUCTS: Imports (for 'con sump t ion) into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 







Year ended 


.Tune___30 




Commodity imported 


Unit 


Quantity 


Value 




1935-36 ■; 




1935-36 






1934-35 


prelim. ' 


1934-35 


"Drelim, 


CCl^IPETITI^/E 








1 , 000 : 


1,000 


"VSG-ET£3LE PHOLUCTS, CONT'D: 




Thousands 


Thousands'' 


dollars 


dollars 


Oils, cont'd: 












Sssenti;~l and distilled- 














hh* 


345 


367 ; 


73 


72 


Grapeiniit (incl. terpeneless) 


Lh. 


C 


0 ■ 


0 


0 


Lemon, " n 


Lh. 


135 


128 ; 


102 


143 


Oranj:e , " " 


Lh. 

Lb. 


151 


169 ; 
]_ 


168 

1 


179 
6 






: 53,887 


90,229 


Seeds, except oilseeds: 












Forage crop seeds- 












jafalfa 


Lh. 


- 83 


85 ; 


17 


11 


Glover- 












Alsike 


Lh. 


1 


33 ■ 


^/ 


5 


Crimson 


Lh. 


257 


2,116 ; 


23 


109 


Hod 


Lh . 


1 






1 


Other clover 


L"b. 


1,168 


2,286 ■ 


152 


209 


Grass 


Lh. 


37,877 


6 , 656 


1,947 


556 


Vetch 


Lb. 


404 




20 


79 


Garden and field seeds- 












Catilja^e , 


Lb . 


212 


280 : 


92 


107 


Canary 


Lb . 


19, 519 


18,310 '. 


472 


596 


Onion 


Lb. 


219 


249 : 


196 


1 88 


Spinach 


Lb. 


2, 7B5 


3,188 i 


313 


288 


Su-gar beet 


Lb. 


11,339 


13.106 ; 


2,244 


1 71^^ 


Turnip 

Other garden and field seeds 
Seeds for the Dept. of Agri . . 


Lb. 
Lb. 


' 1,190 
2, 236 


981 . 
2,133 • 
e/ : 


129 
577 
1 


86 
589 
8 


Total seeds, ex, oilseeds . . 






: 6,183 


4.551 


Spices : 












Cap si cram, or red or cayenne 












peppers, incl. chilli- 














Lb. 


i/ ■ 


; 


<3-./ 


■ i/ ■ 




Lb. 


1,751 


1,407 : 


137 


93 


Ma star d- 


Lb • 


858 


1,675 i 


301 


198 




Lb. 


1,047 


1,079 ; 


609 


643 




Lb. 


10,687 


7,901 i 


469 


358 




Lb. 


6,344 


7,205 


867 


844 


Starch: 














Lb. 


10 , 750 


8,205 ; 


224 


159 




Lb. 


762 


612 i 


30 


23 




Lb. 


11.512 


8,817 •' 


254 


182 



Coiitinued - 



November 9, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



567 



AGRICULTURAL Al^D K3R3ST PRODUCTS: Imports (for consimption) into 
the United States, 1934^35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Commo d i ty irapo r t e d ' Un i t 



COMPMHIYJ. : 
TEG-ETABLE PRODUCTS, CONT'D: 

Sugar, molasses and siro-p s; ; 

Beet sugar (2,000 lb. )" : Ton 

Cane sugar (2,000 lb.)- ; 

Product of the P.I ; Ton 

Cuba '■ 'Von 

Other countries [ Ton 

Total sugar \ Ton 

Dextrose, lactose, honey, etc- ; Lb. 

Maple sugar and maple sirup .. ; Lb. 

Molasses- ; 

Edible ; Qa,l. 

Not for human consumption- ; 

product of the P-I ; G-al . 

Other ; Gal. 

Total sugar, molasses ; 

and sirups . . , j 

Tobacco, unmanufactuye d; i 

Leaf- ; 

Cigar leaf (filler)- ; 

Sterrmed i Lb. 

Unstemmed • Lb. 

Cigarette leaf, unstenirned . . ; Lb. 

Leaf for cigar wrappers .... | Lb. 

Total leaf j Lb. 

Product of the P.I i Lb. 

Scrap : Lb. 

Stems, not cut, etc ; Lb. 

Total tobacco, unrafd. ; Lb. 

Vegetables and preparations: ; 

Fresh and dried- • 

Beans- j 

Green, unripe or in brine j Lb. 

Dried j Lb. 

Chickpeas or garbanzos- \ 

Green, unripe & split ! Lb. 

Dried i Lb. 

CoY/peas- : 

Blackeye, dried : Lb, 

Other : Lb. 

Cucumbers ; Lb. 

Eggplant ; Lb. 



Year ended June 30 



Quantity 


Value 




. 1935-36 




1935-36 


1934-35 


; prelim. 


; 1934-35 


; prelim. 








; 7- ■ « 

. 1 , JUO 


Thousands 


' Thous, and 3 


: dollars 


• dollars 


d/ 


i 2 


; 12 


i 48 


592 


: 842 


i 32 , 347 


i 51,397 


2,736 


; 2,322 


; 90,309 


: 107,915 


39 


:' 51 


710 


; 1, 147 


3 , 3 o7 


i 3,217 


124,378 


: 160,507 


139 


; 100 


; 16 


• 13 


4,910 


; 4,390 


; 583 


1 681 


8,736 


; 14,041 


: 1,118 


: 1,716 


4,285 


: 0 


; 95 


■ 0 


238,019 


: 195,175 


: 9. 847 


' 9,683 






136.037 


172 . 600 


6,465 


9,285 


4,313 


6,361 


4,192 


5,235 


1,977 


2,577 


38,638 


43,539 


12,364 


13,421 


fe'.j.W.J- 


X ■. or;u 


A Q CO 


A 01 A 


51,316 


59 , 949 


_2axec6_: 


2 6 , 573 


2,170 


2,370 


215 ; 


213 


2»3?6 


3 , 422 


799 • 


985 




.. 3,'l54 


. 6B ; 


75 


58.270 


67,895 


23,981 : 


27,846 


4,441 


5,618 j 


129 i 


187 


34,814 


15,027 ' 


783 ; 


402 


6 


1 ' 


d/ i 


d/ 


12,121 


10,397 : 


395 : 


352 


d/ ■ 


88 ■; 


d/ : 


1 


0 


1 : 


0 ; 


d/ 


2,294 ; 


2,459 : 


47 ; 


49 


5,164 ■ 


8,235 : 


107 ; 


169 



Continued - 



568 



foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, l]o. 19 



AGRICULTUHAL MTD EORSST PRODUCTS: Imports (for consunpticn) into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-56, cont'd 



Cornmo di. ty inro o r t e d 



Year ended June 50 



Quant i ty _ 







1935-56 


, -LytV±— oD 


1935'r36 




J- y lift- CO 


...prelira.f 


■Drelim* 








1 , 0\^0 


1 , 000 




T'liousand'^ 


J. -LX'-' '-^-O Clii LL 0 




U.vJ _L Xcl X 0 


T "K 




i , 2 r U 


py . 7 


1 r\r\ 


T "K 
li D . 


T P C 


U , /I'D 








D Q "7 

o J o5d 


li , bl'4 




4ob 


T "k 


CO ^ 


COT 

521 


287 


n" cr 

^05 


M.D. 


C^/ 1,2 fob 


i , r 4 i' 


/ CT 
g./ 53 


69 


Lb. 


14,392 


4,114 


325 


86 


T V 
Li D . 




0 , Ubo 


<sL'o 


14o 


T 'n 


r , r 0 




•7 ^ZO 

332 


TOO 

ixjy 


L D . 


/I "7 Q 


oi 


14 


2 


Lb. 


7,653 


10,781 


200 


282 


li D . 


, 1 4r b 


0 "7 ICQ 

<i / , i bo 


Ob 


3bx 


T "K 

LD. 


0/1 ^7 3 '"i 


0/1 a'n^ 
24 , b /2 


313 


43u 


LD . 


/ , 1 oU 


o2 , 504 


1 , ooU 


1 , 996 


T V, 

LD . 


1 D 


11 


36 


30 


LD . 


yi , r<db 


1 X b , y 1 b 


54o 


0 /o 




e/ 


e/ 


377 


345 


LD . 


/ ( ( 


4 Did 


0 T C 

235 


14b 


Lb. 


1 J 0d6 


rr 

337 


«9 


0 0 
28 


Lb. 


76,286 


64,985 


2,865 


2,619 


Lb. 


237 


293 


13 


17 


Lb. 


2,583 


3,180 , 


166 


204 


Lb. 


1,585 


732 


167 


67 


Lb. 


12,110 


10,851 


431 


418 


Lb. 


12,233 


8,525 


926 


866 


Lb. 


7,037 


7,454 


526 


565 


Lb. 


1,306 


1,085 


58 


51 


Lb. 


4,020 


4,662 


239 


274 


Lb. 


225 


1,137 


4 


16 


Lb. 


18,740 


27,706 


207 


360 


Lb. 


2,785 


3,9 63 


, 32 


57 


Lb. 


180,]^55 


218,371 


3,437 


4,647 




e/ 


1.281 


1,358 . 








17,565 


18. 604 



Value 



C0MPET~TIV1 



VEGETABLE PRODUCT: 
Vegetables and preparations . con t 



a cn.ici< 



Fresh and dried, cont'd- 

Endive 

G-arlic 

Lentils and lupines . . . 

Mushroons, fresh and dried 

Okra 

Onions 

Peas (except cow 

Green 

Dried 

Split 

peppers , . 

Potatoes, white or Irish- 
Certified seed 

Oth'r-r potatoes, white . 

Tomatoes, natural state . 

Truffles 

Turnips & rutabagas 

Other vegetables, fresh . 
Canned- 
Mushrooms 

Peas . . . ♦ 

Tomatoes 

Other vegetables, cnnned 
Prepared or preserved- 

Pickled vegetables ...... 

Pimicntos, in brine, oil, e 

Gauce« 

Tomato paste and sauce . . 

Other vegetables , prep or pres 

Sean cake, mi so, etc 

Earinaceous substances- 
Arrowroot starch, flour, etc 

Sago & arrowroot, crude 

Sago flour 

Tapioca- 

Crude and cassava . . . 



Ground or prepared . . • 
Other vegetable substances 

Total vegetables & prep. 



Continued - 



NoremlDer 9, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



569 



AG.RICULTUML Al© F^HEoT PRODUCTS: L-^ipcrts (for cons-onption) into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-35, cont'd 









Year ended June 30 




Commodity imported 


; Unit 


Ouantity 


; Value 






; 1935-36 




; 1935-36 






i 1934-35 


; prelim. 


: 1934-35 


: IDrelim. 


CCI.'IPETITIYE 








: 1,000 


: 1 , 000 


VSGETABIS PRODUCTS, COiTT'D: 




: Ihousandc 


Thousands 


\ dollars 


: dollars 


Jv-iscell.^jneous vegeta"ble. prQd'u.cts : 












Argols, tartar & Trine lees... • 


:' Lb . 


; 14,307 


i 18,525 


: 828 


; 1,010 


T7ines- 












Champagne & other sparkling 


: Gal. 


289 


\ 232 


: 2,173 


i 2,152 ■ 




Gal. 


2,443 


: 2,527 


: 6,962 


: 6 , 584 


Other beverages & fr"ait juices 




e/ 


i ey 


; 1,124 


■ 1,567 


Citru.s fruit juices, unfit for 














Lb. 


120 


i 229 


; 4 


: 9 




Lb. 


175 


' 83 


: 139 


i 1C6 


Broomcorn (2,000 lb.) 

.Drugs , herb s , etc 


Ton 


5 


d/ 


: 509 


j 50 




Lb. 


182 


232 


23 


: 23 




Lb . 


18 


25 


36 


; 43 




Lb. 


381 


283 


32 


19 














Bulbs, roots, and coiros- 












Hyacinth 


llo . 


13,608 


14,607 


614 


626 


Lily : 


ITo . 


18,307 


21,423 


483 


530 


Lily of the valley ' 


No. 


11,601 


8,216 


243 


270 


narcissus ■ 


No. 


919 


247 


40 


11 




ITo. 


71,004 


75,184. 


1,197 


1,248 




No . 


15,252 . 


16,002 


123 


121 






d \ 


e/ 


44^ 


65 


Trees, plant cuttings, etc.-! 














No. ■ 


2\ 


■ 4: 


4/ 


Rose stock and plants ... : 
Other trees, plants, etc. \ 


No. ; 
No. . 


S , 436 • 

[325,: 


7,022: 

858: 


103: 
41 : 


120 
94 


Total nursery and \ 












greenhouse stock .... : 
palm leaf, natural j 








3.888: 


3.085 


Lb. * 


20 i 


51; 


2: 


2 


Rice straw and fiber 


Lb . . 


l,954i 


731: 


51: 


16 


Ye ^:;e table gJ.ue ; 

TTafers, in&diblo > 


Lb. : 


e/ 


0: 

e/ 1 


d/ . : 

2V 


0 

16 


Total vegetable products rj \ 








397,517; 


433,217 


Total animals and • 




















100,434: 


157,166 


Tot'al competitive agric^oltural • 




















497,951; 


640, 383 



Continued - 



570 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, Ho. 19 



AGi'-ICULlU-iiUi liSD FOiiiiST P-..CDTJCTS: Imports (for constv-iption^ into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 193o-35, cont'd 









Y'^ex ended June 30 




L'OIIL'llOQ.a. oy ILIpOrtftJU. 


unit 


Quantity 


Valce 












Xb OD— O O 






Xu '.)'±—iJO 


prox liii. 


J.t) O'^i— OO 


■prel iin . 




IION-COMPZTITIY£ 









1 , 000 


1 , 000 


MIft'iiiL PROIiUCTS: 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


Silk, jirirnanti.::" ac tur e d : 














Lb. 


60,990 

X J- 


Gl , 145 

n 


74,572 

AA. 


99,558 

n 

V 




Lb. 


.uj-ilv, LUilUf.illLU. c:.CIiU.reCL « a 


LO. 




O.I. , .L'-tU 


OA 

/'± , D± O 


GO Q 


(iiuux,_ Lu.u.ij.u., ^xicjt! xiL Donu. 1 or ixso 












in Cci-;^o os ,^0 00 -Actual v/uignt: 












I) onsko i , Smyrna , et c , witno'.it 












iviux iilo or jjjn__jXisn d±ooo.— 














JjD . 


62,401 


86,967^ 


6,944 


11,793 


(s'ash'jd, scoiirod, etc. . . . . 


Lb. 


31 ,547 


54 , 545 


4, 868 


9 ,559 


0 the r not 1' i n e r t ban 40 ' s - 












Woolen typo- 












In tiiL- grease 


Lb. 




X , D O J. 


1 no 


Ibx 


¥a,aii;3d, scoured, etc. ... 


Ld. 


lo2 


'"^ o 


24 


39 


ifVorstGCL t>^pe — 














Lb. 


£/ 


C^/ <c!,Oci<d 




£./ 260 




Lb. 


■K / 






cy 122 


Lair 01 t:ie camel- 












Lb. 

LD, 


82 

1 Ps 
J- o 


' 03 


10 

o 


12 
p 




Tote,l wool, -uzuiifd, (fros in 


t 










"boJid, etc, ) -Actual weight 


Ld. 


95,322 . 


146 .,178 


^ 11^953 


21,988 


Total animal products «... 








86,574 


121,546 


imzHABuE PROrUGTS; 












Qho opiate and cocoa; 












Chocolate, prepared ..«.,.«...• 


Lb. 


277 


377 


59 


83 




Lb, 


5,155 


2,946 


325 


346 




Lb. 


539 ,076 


570,957 


24,384 


26 , 142 


Coffee (exceot intn Pnnrto •Rif.n') 
Fibers, vegetable: (2,240 lb.) 


Lb. : 




ri52 Qpfi 


1 '^i5 1 6R 






Ton 
Ton 


4 


5 


150 
395 


183 
518 




6 


7 




Ton 
Ton 


11 

40 


12 
48 


2,157 
2,705 

0 

5,243 


2,635 
5 , 724 

0 

12,719 






Ton 
Ton 


0 
74 


0 

151 




Other vegetable fibers (excl. 






Ton 


6 


9 


474 


623 




Ton 


141 


235 


11,125 


22 , 402 



Continued - 



November 9, .1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



571 



AGRICULTUEAL iJD FOEEST PPjJDUCTS: Irn_porcs (for consu^-ption) into 
the United States, 1934-35 srd 1935-36, cont'd 



Commodity imported 



Year ended Jiane 30 



Unit 



NOI- T-COMPETITIV B 
VEGETABLE PHODUCT S , COilT ' D : 
FrTjlts_and preparations : 

Batianas . . . . , 

Plantains 

Ginger root, candied or 

otherwise preserved 

Oils, essential an d diKtilled_ : 

Ittar of roses (otto) 

Bergaiaot 

Cassia and cinnamon 

Citronella rnd. lemon grass. 

Geranium: 

Lavendar and spike lavendar 

Line 

Saindalwood 

Other essential and distilled 
( exc 1 . lemon , orange ,gi^ef rait 
eucalyptus & peppermint)^ 
Total essential and 
distilled oils. . . 
Ruhher and similar gum ^ 

Gutta halata 

Gutta percha 

Gutta siak • , . 

Jelutong or pontianalc . . 
PublDer, crude- 
Milk of, or latez.... 

Gu37Aile 

Other crude rublDer. . . 
Total rahher, cnide 
Total rubber & simlar giv& 
Spices: 

Allspice (Pimento )uJigro-und. 

Carairray seed 

Cardaraom seed 

Cassia and cassia vera 

Cinnamon & chips of ,ung round; 

Cloves, unground 

Ginger root unground, no t prej? 

Mace, unground 

Kutmegs, unground 



1934-35 



Q,uantity. 



Value 



1935-36 
prelim. 



1934-35 



1,000 





: Thousands Thousands: dollars 


: dollars 


Bunch 


; 51,987: 54,684 


;■ 26,593 


; 27,412 




j e/ j e/ 


: 166 


: 162 


Lb. 


i i , 050 : 1 , 131 


: 84 


: 83 


Oz.. 


j 31 ; 29 


j . 232 


i 227 


Lb. 


i 86 : 112 


: 110 


: 163 


Lb • 


: 428 : 468 


: 301 


: 336 


Lb. 


' 2 337 ■ 1 R43 




: 494 


Ir'h » 


139 i lie 


; 653 


' 537 


Lb. 


261 : 228 


: 683 


• 569 


Lb. 


; . 46 : 59 


: 232 


: 291 


Lb. 


1 : 3 


: 3 


: 11 


Lb . 


2,296 : 2.391 


: 1 , 224 


: 1 , 339 






4; 132 


• 3,967 


Lb. 


1,716: 1,257 


260 


187 


Lb. 


4,252 : 3,334 


566 


534 


Lb. 


0 : 144. 


0 


14 


Lb. 


9,685- 15,407 


717 


1 , 444 


Lb. . 


&/ ;c/ 21,355 


s/ 


c/ 2,969 




563:"' 1,745 


48 


147 


Lb. ; 


-9^.JS94_991j254_ 


112.874 


122,805 


Lb. ; 




1 1 QPP 


'.^6^5.. iSi^i— 


Lb, ! 


,.?8i,606 il, 034. 496 : 


114.465 i 


128 , 100 


Lb. : 


2,272 '] 4,278 : 


87 i 


370 


Lb. : 


5,522: 6,314: 


357 : 


449 


Lb. : 


134 ; 252 1 


75 : 


143 


Lb, I 


9 ,028 : 11,103 ] 


689 j 


822 


Lb. ; 


667 : 797 : 


88 : 


98 


Lb. : 


5,145 • 3,308 : 


499 i 


387 


Lb. : 


3,175 : 3,443 : 


254 : 


301 


Lb. i 


723 ; 733 : 


266 : 


310 


Lb. ; 


4,058 ■ 4,144 : 


439 • 


453 



1935-36 
pr elim . 
" 1,000 



Continued - 



572 



Foreign Crops trid I/iarkets 



Vol. 33, Ho. 19 



A&HI CULT ISAl iGIb]ST PRODUCTS: 
the United States, 1934- 



C b r.m 0 di t y ' irap o r t e d 



Imports (for consuaptiorx) into 
-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



wOlT-rCGliPITITlVi; 



papr: 



Y^ar ended June 30 



s . 



VSG-ETAiLS^ F5.0LUCT S , COK T ' D : 
Spices, cont'd; ■ 
Pepper, unground-' 

3l£-ck 

White 

Tonka "beans 

Vanilla heans .... 
iviisc. apices (excl 

colory seed, ca^psicum &niiistard] 

Total spices 

Tea 

Misc. vej^-^etaple pro dacts : 
Brazilian or pichurim "beans 

Broomroot 

Locust or caro'b beezis 

Tea, impure vv'aste, etc .... 
leroa mate (ParajH,ua,y tea) . . 
Vegetable ivory or tagua nu 
Lrugs, herbs, etc . - 

Cinchona, bark or other from 
which quinine racy be 
extracted . . 
Licorice extract 
Licorice root . . 
Opium crude 8.5 percent 
more of laorj-jhia. . 

Psyllium seed 

Pyrdthru-Vi or insect 

flov/ers 

Sonn-i 

Other dmga, herbs, etc. 

(gxcI. bella.donra, ginseng 

and straiaonii-jn) 

Total drugSjheroSjetc 
Total vegyta.'ole products ... 

Total aniinal products 

TOTAL FJh-COrfLPETlTiVS 

AGPIGULTUML PP.ODUCTS 

TOTAL COivtPSTITIVS 

AGPICULTUPAL PIiOLUCTS r/ 



cide 



TOTAL AGHIGULTUEAL IMPORTS r/ 

















1955-35 . 




1935-35 




1934-35 


prelim. 


1934-35 


prelim. 








1,000 


1 , u 0 




Thousands 


Th ou s a,nd s' 


O-Oxxa.r s 


CLOXXai G 


Lb. 


28,573 


36 , 886 


2,492 


1 , 856 


Lb . 


3,952 


4,181 


541 


465 


Lb. 


647 


567 


745 


634 


Lb. 


915 


998 


1,430 


1,596 




5 96° 


6 259 


292 


320 


Lb. 


70.981 


,63,263, 


,.8 ,,554 


8,204 


Lb . ; 


83,572 


83, 91o 


17,172 


17,323 


Lb. 


^/ 


0 




0 


T,b 






'X 

»_> 


9 


Lb. 


767 


1,499 


17 


18 


Lb. 


3,451 


4,915 


54 


100 








38 


1 4 


Lb. 


10,186 


12,534 


137 


174 


Lb. 


1,767 


1,853 


704 


710 


Lb. 


575 


727 


92 


119 


Lb. 


55,224 


48 , 631 


1,057 


924 


Lb. • 


117 


122 


557 


536 


Lb. , 


1,483 


2 , 743 


91 


162 


Lb , 


11,219 


17,725 


2,113 


1,817 


Lo. 


1,356 


2,105 


77 


106 


Lb. 


. 19 , 743 


25,270 , 


2,143 


3 , 1 61 


Lb. 


92,4.94 


99,174 


, 6,834 


7,535 








; 34i^ , 320 


578,020 








86,573 


121,546 








"435,693 


499,566 








•497,951 


640,383 








933,844 


1,139,949 



Continued - 



]\Tovember 9, 1936 Toreign Crops and Markets 573 

AGHIGULTUTIAL MD FOREST PRODUCTS: Imports (for consijmption) into 
the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 







Year ended June 30 


Comniodity imported 


Unit 


Quantity 


Va.lue 






1934-35 


1935-36 
' prelim. 


; 193'i-35 


1935-36 
Drelim . 


ROREST PRODUCTS: 

Dyeini!; and tannins materials! 




Thousands 


Thousands 


; 1 , 000 
' dollars 


1 , 000 
dollars 


Extracts for dyeing, 














Lb. 


492 


729 


: 68 


95 


Extracts for tannini;,- 














Lb. 


12,306 


15,234 


; 297 


366 




Lb. 


111,962 


116,897 


: 2,768 


3,445 


Other extracts for tanning . 


Lb. 


13,130 


10,386 


: 409 


329 


(jvimDier or terra-japonica .... 


Lb. 


3,580 


3,751 


• 227 


250 


JjOgWOOCL \Cj,C'^\) id.; • 


Ton 


10 


15 


141 


203 


Myrooaians iruib (^/d,(d^U iu.J 


Ton 


11 


16 


176 


229 




Ld , 


2,542 


2,492 


218 


184 


^[,u.e ura-CiiO t,voo(i i^ojo-U 1D» j ... 


Ton 


26 


24 


328 


549 




Ton 


2 


n 


81 


94 


other crude, dyeing, etc 


LD . 

T V 

li: 


23,005 
15.375 


12,567 
24, 603 
14,045 


314 
127 
276 


206 
289 
267 


Total dyeing and tanning 




















5,430 


6. 506 


Gums, resins and balsnms: 














Lb. 






111 

XXX 


1 1 Q 
XXO 


Camphor- 












Natural- 














Lb. 


icJ , 1 ijO 


<o , U X o 


'71 






Lb. 


1 O CI 

1 , 2dJ. 


966 


508 


421 




Lb. 




i , 45 7 


Sol 


473 


Chicle, crude 


Lb. 


O , V CO 


9 , 726 


1 , 2 bl 


2,406 


G-'UjdjS and reisir •- 












Ar^bi c or f^^■•^p^:'^ 1 


T,"b . 

.u u • 


7,975 


7,145 


536 


575 


Krdsva fk^rrvn^ -irifi trO i"n 


T,b . 


4,C36 


5, 179 


365 


433 


Traga.canth 


jj 0 • 


2 ,290 


1 , 885 


467 


490 


\J KjLXrzX UJll o Li.iiU. i- -LXio •••••• 






e/ 


338 


414 


Tn r . X)'] t.rVi "nrl 'h7Tr''-r)rn ■!■ "l n f> 




e/ 


e/ 


191 


265 


Varnish guras and resins- 














Lb. 


12,229 


15,170 


7.^2 


845 




Lb. 


1 , 023 


1 , 559 


113 


147 


Lac, crij.de J seed, button, etc. 


Lb. 


7,232 


10,500 


1,076 


1,005 


Shellac- 










Lb. 


323 


335 


78 


59 




Lb. 


12,106 


19,055 


2,020 


2,321 


other varnish gums, etc. ... 
Total gums, resins rnd 


Lb. 


14, 798 


22,113 


7QS 


1 , 1 34 


















9,463 


11 , 651 



574 



Poreign Crops a.n(i Markets 



Vol. 33, ¥.0. 19 



AC-EICULTLmL AM) lOREST PRODUCTS: Imports (for cons^oraption) into 
the United States, ISS-^i-SS and 1935-36, cont'd 







; Year ended June 30 


Commodity imported 


: Unit 


; .Qaantit;/- 


Value 








: 1935-36 




: 1935-55 






: 1934-35 


• prelim. 


:. 1934-35 


; prelim . 


P0PJ]ST PRODUCTS, COITT'D: 








; 1 , 000 


: 1 , 000 


XIo od , unjnanuf ac tured: 




'Thousands 


•Thousands 


: dollars 


■ dollars 


Logs and round or lieTrn timter- 














M . ft . 


23 


21 


; 192 


i 230 


Pir, spruce or \y. hemlock- 














M.ft, 


28 


84 


; 277 


' 810 


Rounded, heT7n or so^uared. . 


M . f t . 








H ' 


Teak 


i.I . ft • 




■ 1 / 
sJ 


' 1 8 


p. / 1 


Other, except cal)inet rroods 




e/ 


; 90 




Caoinet vroods, in the log- 












Cedar, Spanish 


M . ft . 


J_ 


_L 


■ ( o 


• O \J 


I.I.aiiogany 


M.ft . 


11 


17 


: 740 


: 1,316 


Other cahinet i70od3 


M . ft . 




8 


( ^ M. f 




Other wood, unmfd.- 












Erior, ivv, or laurel root. 


]\'o . 




29,444 


; 383 


: 643 


Polos, telegraph, trolley, etc 


¥.0 . 


207 


240 


i 532 


; 628 




¥o . 


335 


283 


: 187 


198 




Lb. 




7 8?0 










el 


e/ 




1 1 4'^ 


Sav/mill r-roducts: 










Boards, planks, deals, etc- 












Ha.rdwoods 


M.ft. 


21 


36 


922 


1,363 


Softwoods- 












Pir,etc. (mixed shipments) 


M.'ft . 


0 


17 


0 


213 


Pir 


M.ft. 


14 


102 


322 


1, 778 


Hem.lock 


Il.ft. 


a-/ 


35 


9 


462 


Larch 


M.ft . 


^1 


d/ 




5 


Pine 


M. ft . 


89 


89 


2,102 


2 J 233 


Spruce 


M.ft. - 


143 


264 


3,458 


6 , 270 


OtiiiGr , 


M.ft. 


10 


21 


569 


996 


GalDinofc woods- 












Sa-vfed, incl. flooring ... 


M.ft. ; 


24 


15 


1,038 


617 


Sav;ed, planed, tongued,etc. 


111 .ft. 


c/ 2 


op 


c/ 110 


924 




M. 


188 


2oo 


464 


728 






e/ : 


e/ 


119 


153 




Square 


1,725 • 


2,717 


4,347 . 


7,474 


PulpT.'Oo do : 








Peeled- 














Cord , 


737 ; 


751 " 


5,857 i 


6,149 




Cord ; 


165 i 


172 . 


877 ; 


683 


Rossed- 














Cord 1 


3 i 


12 ; 


22 : 


146 




Cord ■ 


4/ ' 


0 




0 



Continued - 



Uovemoer 9, 1936 



Toreign Crops and Markets 



575 



AGHICULTUPJIL liro P0E2ST PROIXJCTS : Imports (for consLUcption) into 
the United States, 1934-35 f^d 1935-36, cont'd 



Y ear endc 



Oonro.odity imported 



POEEST PRODUCTS, COilT'D: 
Pulpi,70 ods , cont ' d ; 
Rough- 
Spruce . . 

Other 

Veneers mid plyivoods- 

Total wood 

Misc. forest p ro ducts : 

Cork wood or hark, unmfd. .. 
Osier or willov/ for haskets 
■ffood pulp- (2, COO Ih.) 
Chemical- 
J^alphate- 



Unit 


Quantity 


Value 


, 1934-35 • 


1935-36 ; 
prelim. 


1934-35 


1935-36 
prelim. 




Thousands 


Thousands ; 


1,000 
dollars 


1,000 
dollars 


Cord 
Cord 
Sq..ft. 


159 
13 
5.413 


92 
43 : 

4»923 ; 


1,208 

74 
80 


674 
241 
145 




: '25,778 


37,987 


Lh. 
Lh. 


71,533 

142 , 


67,748 ; 
164 i 


1,683 
5 


2,163 
6 





Ton 


65 


99 


: 3,961 


5,713 




Ton 


495 


597 


; 14 , 648 


18,372 


Sulphite- 


Ton 


384 


493 


: 19,429 


24,545 




Ton 


658 


746 


• 22,356 


25,459 




Ton 




11 


; 373 


485 


Mechanically ground- 


Ton 


12 


21 


' 228 


351 




Ton 


179 


183 


: 3.095 


3,198 


TOTAL SPECIPISD P0PJ:ST PROIUCTS 






■ 106.449 


136,437 


AG-RI CULTURAL- 

Non-competitive products .... 

TOTAL ACRIOULTUR;\L liviPOHTS r/ . 
TOTAL II'/IPOHTS, ALL COM!/IODITIES 






: ; 497,951 
: : 435,893 


640,383 
499. 565 






: : 933,844 
•1,739,155 


1,139,949 
2,206,788 



d J-'one 30. . 



Coir^jiled from official records of the Bureau of Poreign sad. Domestic Commerce and 
United States Tariff Commission, a/ July 1 to December 31. h/ ^''"'^^ separately 
classified. c_/ January 1 to June 30. d/ Less than 500. e^/ Reported in value 
cnly. f/' Included with "other cheese" prior to Petruary 1, 1936. g/ Pehraary 1 
to June 30. hj Included with "other cheese" prior to January 1, 1936. ij Included 
^ith. "other cheese" prior to June 15, 1936. j/ June 15 to June 30. k/ Included 
with "inedihle tallow?" prior to April 1, 1936. i/ April 1 to June 30. a/ Includes 
alhumon, integuments, marrow, and rennet, nj Includes cherries sulphured or in 
"brine prior to January 1, 1936. o/ Excludes barley, corn, oats, and wheat, unfit 
for human consumption. May 1 to June 30. q/ September 1 to June 30. r/ Ex- 
cludes di&tille.d liquors, sj Included with "other crude lubber" prior to January 
1, 1936. 



576 



Poreisn Cronr, and Mar]-:t;ts 
Index 



Vol. 33, i-o. 19 



Late caD; es 

Crop and liarket Prosoects ., 



545 



AGEICULTTX^IAL IMPORTS/ uJITZD STATES 
1935-35 ^ ^ 55]_ 

Barley, production, Czechoslovakia, 

1935,1936 544 

Corn, production, CsechoslovnJcia, 

1935,1936 544 

Lard: 

ETOOrts, Danuoo Easin, 1934-1936 550 
Situation, Danube Basin, 1936 ... 550 
Oats, production, Czechoslovakia, 

1935,1936 544 

Potatoes, production, Czechoslovakia 

1935,1936 544 

Rye, production, C?:echoGlov<'>d:ia, 

1935,1936 544 

Tobacco: 

Consumption: 

China, 1935 :^/7 

Japan, 1935 543 

Manchuria, 1936 549 



Pat^e 

Tobacco, cont'd 

Exports, United States, 19:^3-1936 549 
production: 

China, 1935,1936 547 

o^apan, 1935,1936 548 

Situation, Orient, 1936 546 

Wheat: 

Crop conditions, Argentina, 

November 1936 , . . , 545 

Market conditions, China, 

Oct. 30, 1936 545 

Prices, Snanghai , 

Oct. 30, 1936 546 

Production, Czechoslovakia, 

1935,1936 544 

Fool: 

Carry-over, Arf;entina, 

Oct. 1, 1936 544 

Consumption, Argentina, 

1936-37 544 

Exportable sui-olus, Argentina, 

^535-37 544 

Production, Argentina, 1935, 1936. . 544